59 Emily Dickinson Love Poems That’ll Strike Your Heart

Passionate and heartfelt, Emily Dickinson’s love poems capture the power of true emotions.

As famous American poet Robert Frost once remarked – “Poetry is when an emotion has found its thought and the thought has found words.”

Such masterful lines are poignantly present in her romantic oeuvre.

We invite you to explore Dickinson’s world through some Emily Dickinson love poems – both wildly romantic yet utterly relatable.

These love poems by Emily Dickinson look deep into our relationship experiences, reminding us that sometimes all we need is a little inspiration when facing the highs and lows in life.

Best Emily Dickinson Love Poems

Have you ever read a poem that just completely captures your heart? Well, let us tell you, these Emily Dickinson love poems are definitely in that category. If you’re not familiar with her work, you are seriously missing out. Take a look and see for yourself!

1. The Lovers

       by Emily Dickinson

The rose did caper on her cheek,
Her bodice rose and fell,
Her pretty speech, like drunken men,
Did stagger pitiful.

Her fingers fumbled at her work, —
Her needle would not go;
What ailed so smart a little maid
It puzzled me to know,

Till opposite I spied a cheek
That bore another rose;
Just opposite, another speech
That like the drunkard goes;

A vest that, like the bodice, danced
To the immortal tune, —
Till those two troubled little clocks
Ticked softly into one.

2. If You Were Coming in the Fall

       by Emily Dickinson

If you were coming in the fall,
I ’d brush the summer by
With half a smile and half a spurn,
As housewives do a fly.

If I could see you in a year,
I ’d wind the months in balls,
And put them each in separate drawers,
Until their time befalls.

If only centuries delayed,
I ’d count them on my hand,
Subtracting till my fingers dropped
Into Van Diemen’s land.

If certain, when this life was out,
That yours and mine should be,
I ’d toss it yonder like a rind,
And taste eternity.

But now, all ignorant of the length
Of time’s uncertain wing,
It goads me, like the goblin bee,
That will not state its sting.

3. Resurrection

       by Emily Dickinson

‘T was a long parting, but the time
For interview had come;
Before the judgment-seat of God,
The last and second time

These fleshless lovers met,
A heaven in a gaze,
A heaven of heavens, the privilege
Of one another’s eyes.

No lifetime set on them,
Apparelled as the new
Unborn, except they had beheld,
Born everlasting now.

Was bridal e’er like this?
A paradise, the host,
And cherubim and seraphim
The most familiar guest.

4. Have You Got a Brook in Your Little Heart

       by Emily Dickinson

Have you got a brook in your little heart,
Where bashful flowers blow,
And blushing birds go down to drink,
And shadows tremble so?

And nobody, knows, so still it flows,
That any brook is there;
And yet your little draught of life
Is daily drunken there.

Then look out for the little brook in March,
When the rivers overflow,
And the snows come hurrying from the hills,
And the bridges often go.

And later, in August it may be,
When the meadows parching lie,
Beware, lest this little brook of life
Some burning noon go dry!

5. A Charm Invests a Face

       by Emily Dickinson

A charm invests a face
Imperfectly beheld, —
The lady dare not lift her veil
For fear it be dispelled.

But peers beyond her mesh,
And wishes, and denies, —
Lest interview annul a want
That image satisfies.

6. Why Do I Love” You, Sir?

       by Emily Dickinson

“Why do I love” You, Sir?
Because
The Wind does not require the Grass
To answer Wherefore when He pass
She cannot keep Her place.

Because He knows and
Do not You
And We know not
Enough for Us
The Wisdom it be so

The Lightning never asked an Eye
Wherefore it shut when He was by
Because He knows it cannot speak
And reasons not contained
Of Talk
There be—preferred by Daintier Folk

The Sunrise Sire compelleth Me
Because He’s Sunrise and I see
Therefore Then
I love Thee

7. I Can Wade Grief

       by Emily Dickinson

I can wade Grief –
Whole Pools of it –
I’m used to that –
But the least push of Joy
Breaks up my feet –
And I tip – drunken –
Let no Pebble – smile –
‘Twas the New Liquor –
That was all!

Power is only Pain –
Stranded, thro’ Discipline,
Till Weights – will hang –
Give Balm – to Giants –
And they’ll wilt, like Men –
Give Himmaleh –
They’ll Carry – Him!

8. Dare You See a Soul

       by Emily Dickinson

Dare you see a Soul at the White Heat?
Then crouch within the door —
Red — is the Fire’s common tint —
But when the vivid Ore
Has vanquished Flame’s conditions,
It quivers from the Forge
Without a color, but the light
Of unanointed Blaze.
Least Village has its Blacksmith
Whose Anvil’s even ring
Stands symbol for the finer Forge
That soundless tugs — within —
Refining these impatient Ores
With Hammer, and with Blaze
Until the Designated Light
Repudiate the Forge –

9. Success is Counted Sweetest

       by Emily Dickinson

Success is counted sweetest
By those who ne’er succeed.
To comprehend a nectar
Requires sorest need.

Not one of all the purple Host
Who took the Flag today
Can tell the definition
So clear of victory

As he defeated – dying –
On whose forbidden ear
The distant strains of triumph
Burst agonized and clear!

10. I Know That He Exists

       by Emily Dickinson

I know that He exists.
Somewhere — in Silence —
He has hid his rare life
From our gross eyes.

‘Tis an instant’s play.
‘Tis a fond Ambush —
Just to make Bliss
Earn her own surprise!

But — should the play
Prove piercing earnest —
Should the glee — glaze —
In Death’s — stiff — stare —

Would not the fun
Look too expensive!
Would not the jest —
Have crawled too far!

11. After Great Pain, a Formal Feeling Comes

       by Emily Dickinson

After great pain, a formal feeling comes –
The Nerves sit ceremonious, like Tombs –
The stiff Heart questions ‘was it He, that bore,’
And ‘Yesterday, or Centuries before’?

The Feet, mechanical, go round –
A Wooden way
Of Ground, or Air, or Ought –
Regardless grown,
A Quartz contentment, like a stone –

This is the Hour of Lead –
Remembered, if outlived,
As Freezing persons, recollect the Snow –
First – Chill – then Stupor – then the letting go –

12. Ah, Moon — and Star!

       by Emily Dickinson

Ah, Moon — and Star!
You are very far —
But were no one
Farther than you —
Do you think I’d stop
For a Firmament —
Or a Cubit — or so?

I could borrow a Bonnet
Of the Lark —
And a Chamois’ Silver Boot —
And a stirrup of an Antelope —
And be with you — Tonight!

But, Moon, and Star,
Though you’re very far —
There is one — farther than you —
He — is more than a firmament — from Me —
So I can never go!

13. Love—is That Later Thing Than Death

       by Emily Dickinson

Love—is that later Thing than Death—
More previous—than Life—
Confirms it at its entrance—And
Usurps it—of itself—

Tastes Death—the first—to hand the sting
The Second—to its friend—
Disarms the little interval—
Deposits Him with God—

Then hovers—an inferior Guard—
Lest this Beloved Charge
Need—once in an Eternity—
A smaller than the Large—

14. We Learned the Whole of Love

       by Emily Dickinson

We learned the Whole of Love—
The Alphabet—the Words—
A Chapter—then the mighty Book—
Then—Revelation closed—

But in Each Other’s eyes
An Ignorance beheld—
Diviner than the Childhood’s—
And each to each, a Child—

Attempted to expound
What Neither—understood—
Alas, that Wisdom is so large—
And Truth—so manifold!

Famous Emily Dickinson Love Poems

Whether you’re currently in love or still waiting for that special someone, reading these famous Emily Dickinson love poems will tug at your heartstrings in a way that few other things can. So what are you waiting for? Dive in and prepare to be amazed.

1. I’ve Got an Arrow Here

       by Emily Dickinson

I’ve got an arrow here;
Loving the hand that sent it,
I the dart revere.

Fell, they will say, in ‘skirmish’!
Vanquished, my soul will know,
By but a simple arrow
Sped by an archer’s bow.

2. The Daisy Follows Soft the Sun

       by Emily Dickinson

The daisy follows soft the sun,
And when his golden walk is done,
Sits shyly at his feet.
He, waking, finds the flower near.
“Wherefore, marauder, art thou here?”
“Because, sir, love is sweet!”

We are the flower, Thou the sun!
Forgive us, if as days decline,
We nearer steal to Thee, —
Enamoured of the parting west,
The peace, the flight, the amethyst,
Night’s possibility!

3. Wild Nights – Wild Nights!

       by Emily Dickinson

Wild nights – Wild nights!
Were I with thee
Wild nights should be
Our luxury!

Futile – the winds –
To a Heart in port –
Done with the Compass –
Done with the Chart!

Rowing in Eden –
Ah – the Sea!
Might I but moor – tonight –
In thee!

4. That I Did Always Love

       by Emily Dickinson

That I did always love,
I bring thee proof:
That till I loved
I did not love enough.

That I shall love alway,
I offer thee
That love is life,
And life hath immortality.

This, dost thou doubt, sweet?
Then have I
Nothing to show
But Calvary.

5. Consecration

       by Emily Dickinson

Proud of my broken heart since thou didst break it,
Proud of the pain I did not feel till thee,
Proud of my night since thou with moons dost slake it,
Not to partake thy passion, my humility.

6. “Hope” is the Thing with Feathers

       by Emily Dickinson

“Hope” is the thing with feathers –
That perches in the soul –
And sings the tune without the words –
And never stops – at all –

And sweetest – in the Gale – is heard –
And sore must be the storm –
That could abash the little Bird
That kept so many warm –

I’ve heard it in the chillest land –
And on the strangest Sea –
Yet – never – in Extremity,
It asked a crumb – of me.

7. The Moon Is Distant from the Sea

       by Emily Dickinson

The moon is distant from the sea,
And yet with amber hands
She leads him, docile as a boy,
Along appointed sands.

He never misses a degree;
Obedient to her eye,
He comes just so far toward the town,
Just so far goes away.

Oh, Signor, thine the amber hand,
And mine the distant sea, —
Obedient to the least command
Thine eyes impose on me.

8. He Touched Me, So I Live to Know

       by Emily Dickinson

He touched me, so I live to know
That such a day, permitted so,
I groped upon his breast.
It was a boundless place to me,
And silenced, as the awful sea
Puts minor streams to rest.

And now, I ’m different from before,
As if I breathed superior air,
Or brushed a royal gown;
My feet, too, that had wandered so,
My gypsy face transfigured now
To tenderer renown.

9. I Felt a Funeral, in My Brain

       by Emily Dickinson

I felt a Funeral, in my Brain,
And Mourners to and fro
Kept treading – treading – till it seemed
That Sense was breaking through –

And when they all were seated,
A Service, like a Drum –
Kept beating – beating – till I thought
My mind was going numb –

And then I heard them lift a Box
And creak across my Soul
With those same Boots of Lead, again,
Then Space – began to toll,

As all the Heavens were a Bell,
And Being, but an Ear,
And I, and Silence, some strange Race,
Wrecked, solitary, here –

And then a Plank in Reason, broke,
And I dropped down, and down –
And hit a World, at every plunge,
And Finished knowing – then –

10. Title Divine is Mine

       by Emily Dickinson

TITLE divine is mine
The Wife without
The Sign.
Acute degree
Conferred on me –
Empress of Calvary.
Royal all but the
Crown – 
Betrothed, without the swoon
God gives us women
When two hold
Garnet to garnet,
Gold to gold – 
Born – Bridalled – 
Shrouded –
In a day
 Tri-Victory – 
  ‘My Husband’
Women say
Stroking the melody,
Is this the way?

11. There is no Frigate Like a Book

       by Emily Dickinson

There is no Frigate like a Book
To take us Lands away
Nor any Coursers like a Page
Of prancing Poetry –
This Traverse may the poorest take
Without oppress of Toll –
How frugal is the Chariot
That bears the Human Soul –

12. You Love the Lord—You Cannot See

       by Emily Dickinson

You love the Lord—you cannot see—
You write Him—every day—
A little note—when you awake—
And further in the Day.

An Ample Letter—How you miss—
And would delight to see—
But then His House—is but a Step—
And Mine’s—in Heaven—You see.

Short Emily Dickinson Love Poems

It’s impressive how Dickinson can delicately weave together words that evoke such powerful emotions. Her poetry has a way of speaking to the innermost parts of you and touching your soul. Even if you’re not a poetry fan, her work is definitely worth experiencing. These short love poems are perfect for anyone who wants to get lost in the beautiful imagery and language of love. Check them out!

1. Heart We Will Forget Him

       by Emily Dickinson

You and I, tonight!
You must forget the warmth he gave,
I will forget the light.

When you have done pray tell me,
Then I, my thoughts, will dim.
Haste! ‘lest while you’re lagging
I may remember him!

2. I Lived on Dread; To Those Who Know

       by Emily Dickinson

I lived on dread; to those who know
The stimulus there is
In danger, other impetus
Is numb and vital-less.

As’t were a spur upon the soul,
A fear will urge it where
To go without the spectre’s aid
Were challenging despair.

3. As by the Dead We Love to Sit

       by Emily Dickinson

As by the dead we love to sit,
Become so wondrous dear—
As for the lost we grapple
Tho’ all the rest are here—

In broken mathematics
We estimate our prize
Vast—in its fading ration
To our penurious eyes!

4. I Had No Time to Hate

       by Emily Dickinson

I had no time to hate, because
The grave would hinder me,
And life was not so ample I
Could finish enmity.

Nor had I time to love; but since
Some industry must be,
The little toil of love, I thought,
Was large enough for me.

5. I Hide Myself Within My Flower

       by Emily Dickinson

I hide myself within my flower,
That wearing on your breast,
You, unsuspecting, wear me too—
And angels know the rest.

I hide myself within my flower,
That, fading from your vase,
You, unsuspecting, feel for me
Almost a loneliness.

6. We Outgrow Love Like Other Things

       by Emily Dickinson

We outgrow love like other things
And put it in the drawer,
Till it an antique fashion shows
Like costumes grandsires wore.

7. You Left Me

       by Emily Dickinson

You left me Sire two Legacies
A Legacy of Love
A Heavenly Father would suffice
Had He the offer of

You left me Boundaries of Pain
Capacious as the Sea
Between Eternity and Time
Your Consciousness and Me

8. I’m Nobody! Who Are You?

       by Emily Dickinson

I’m nobody! Who are you?
Are you nobody, too?
Then there’s a pair of us — don’t tell!
They’d banish us; you know!

How dreary to be somebody!
How public like a frog
To tell one’s name the livelong day
To an admiring bog!

9. Who Has not Found the Heaven Below

       by Emily Dickinson

Who has not found the heaven below
Will fail of it above.
God’s residence is next to mine,
His furniture is love.

10. Love

       by Emily Dickinson

Love is anterior to life,
Posterior to death,
Initial of creation, and
The exponent of breath.

11. If I Can Stop One Heart from Breaking

       by Emily Dickinson

If I can stop one heart from breaking,
I shall not live in vain;
If I can ease one life the aching,
Or cool one pain,
Or help one fainting robin
Unto his nest again,
I shall not live in vain.

12. To Love Thee Year by Year

       by Emily Dickinson

To love thee Year by Year—
May less appear
Than sacrifice, and cease—
However, dear,
Forever might be short, I thought to show—
And so I pieced it, with a flower, now.

13. Love Reckons by Itself—Alone

       by Emily Dickinson

Love reckons by itself—alone—
“As large as I”—relate the Sun
To One who never felt it blaze—
Itself is all the like it has—

Long Emily Dickinson Love Poems

If you’re looking for an emotional read, let us tell you, these long Emily Dickinson love poems will not disappoint. They’re more than just a collection of words on a page – they’re powerful expressions of love that will stir your heart and leave you feeling moved. Give them a read!

1. I Cannot Live Without You

       by Emily Dickinson

I Cannot live with you,
It would be life,
And life is over there
Behind the shelf

The sexton keeps the key to,
Putting up
Our life, his porcelain,
Like a cup

Discarded of the housewife,
Quaint or broken;
A newer Sevres pleases,
Old ones crack.

I could not die with you,
For one must wait
To shut the other’s gaze down, —
You could not.

And I, could I stand by
And see you freeze,
Without my right of frost,
Death’s privilege?

Nor could I rise with you,
Because your face
Would put out Jesus’,
That new grace

Glow plain and foreign
On my homesick eye,
Except that you, than he
Shone closer by.

They’d judge us — how?
For you served Heaven, you know,
Or sought to;
I could not,

Because you saturated sight,
And I had no more eyes
For sordid excellence
As Paradise.

And were you lost, I would be,
Though my name
Rang loudest
On the heavenly fame.

And were you saved,
And I condemned to be
Where you were not,
That self were hell to me.

So we must keep apart,
You there, I here,
With just the door ajar
That oceans are,
And prayer,

And that pale sustenance,
Despair!

2. Because I Could not Stop for Death

       by Emily Dickinson

Because I could not stop for Death –
He kindly stopped for me –
The Carriage held but just Ourselves –
And Immortality.

We slowly drove – He knew no haste
And I had put away
My labor and my leisure too,
For His Civility –

We passed the School, where Children strove
At Recess – in the Ring –
We passed the Fields of Gazing Grain –
We passed the Setting Sun –

Or rather – He passed Us –
The Dews drew quivering and Chill –
For only Gossamer, my Gown –
My Tippet – only Tulle –

We paused before a House that seemed
A Swelling of the Ground –
The Roof was scarcely visible –
The Cornice – in the Ground –

Since then – ’tis Centuries – and yet
Feels shorter than the Day
I first surmised the Horses’ Heads
Were toward Eternity –

3. A Bird, Came Down the Walk

       by Emily Dickinson

A Bird, came down the Walk –
He did not know I saw –
He bit an Angle Worm in halves
And ate the fellow, raw,

And then, he drank a Dew
From a convenient Grass –
And then hopped sidewise to the Wall
To let a Beetle pass –

He glanced with rapid eyes,
That hurried all abroad –
They looked like frightened Beads, I thought,
He stirred his Velvet Head. –

Like one in danger, Cautious,
I offered him a Crumb,
And he unrolled his feathers,
And rowed him softer Home –

Than Oars divide the Ocean,
Too silver for a seam,
Or Butterflies, off Banks of Noon,
Leap, plashless as they swim.

4. Surrender

       by Emily Dickinson

Doubt me, my dim companion!
Why, God would be content
With but a fraction of the love
Poured thee without a stint.
The whole of me, forever,
What more the woman can, —
Say quick, that I may dower thee
With last delight I own!

It cannot be my spirit,
For that was thine before;
I ceded all of dust I knew, —
What opulence the more
Had I, a humble maiden,
Whose farthest of degree
Was that she might,
Some distant heaven,
Dwell timidly with thee!

5. Love’s Baptism

       by Emily Dickinson

I’m ceded, I’ve stopped being theirs;
The name they dropped upon my face
With water, in the country church,
Is finished using now,
And they can put it with my dolls,
My childhood, and the string of spools
I’ve finished threading too.

Baptized before without the choice,
But this time consciously, of grace
Unto supremest name,
Called to my full, the crescent dropped,
Existence’s whole arc filled up
With one small diadem.

My second rank, too small the first,
Crowned, crowing on my father’s breast,
A half unconscious queen;
But this time, adequate, erect,
With will to choose or to reject.
And I choose — just a throne.

6. The Night Was Wide, and Furnished Scant

       by Emily Dickinson

THE NIGHT was wide, and furnished scant
With but a single star,
That often as a cloud it met
Blew out itself for fear.

The wind pursued the little bush,
And drove away the leaves
November left; then clambered up
And fretted in the eaves.

No squirrel went abroad;
A dog’s belated feet
Like intermittent plush were heard
Adown the empty street.

To feel if blinds be fast,
And closer to the fire
Her little rocking-chair to draw,
And shiver for the poor,

The housewife’s gentle task.
“How pleasanter,” said she
Unto the sofa opposite,
“The sleet than May—no thee!”

7. The Contract

       by Emily Dickinson

I gave myself to him,
And took himself for pay.
The solemn contract of a life
Was ratified this way.

The wealth might disappoint,
Myself a poorer prove
Than this great purchaser suspect,
The daily own of Love

Depreciate the vision;
But, till the merchant buy,
Still fable, in the isles of spice,
The subtle cargoes lie.

At least, ‘t is mutual risk, —
Some found it mutual gain;
Sweet debt of Life, — each night to owe,
Insolvent, every noon.

8. My Life Had Stood – a Loaded Gun

       by Emily Dickinson

My Life had stood – a Loaded Gun –
In Corners – till a Day
The Owner passed – identified –
And carried Me away –

And now We roam in Sovreign Woods –
And now We hunt the Doe –
And every time I speak for Him
The Mountains straight reply –

And do I smile, such cordial light
Opon the Valley glow –
It is as a Vesuvian face
Had let it’s pleasure through –

And when at Night – Our good Day done –
I guard My Master’s Head –
’Tis better than the Eider Duck’s
Deep Pillow – to have shared –

To foe of His – I’m deadly foe –
None stir the second time –
On whom I lay a Yellow Eye –
Or an emphatic Thumb –

Though I than He – may longer live
He longer must – than I –
For I have but the power to kill,
Without – the power to die –

9. Longing

       by Emily Dickinson

I envy seas whereon he rides,
I envy spokes of wheels
Of chariots that him convey,
I envy speechless hills

That gaze upon his journey;
How easy all can see
What is forbidden utterly
As heaven, unto me!

I envy nests of sparrows
That dot his distant eaves,
The wealthy fly upon his pane,
The happy, happy leaves

That just abroad his window
Have summer’s leave to be,
The earrings of Pizarro
Could not obtain for me.

I envy light that wakes him,
And bells that boldly ring
To tell him it is noon abroad, —
Myself his noon could bring,

Yet interdict my blossom
And abrogate my bee,
Lest noon in everlasting night
Drop Gabriel and me.

10. You Love Me—You Are Sure

       by Emily Dickinson

You love me—you are sure—

I shall not fear mistake—

I shall not cheated wake—
Some grinning morn—
To find the Sunrise left—
And Orchards—unbereft—
And Dollie—gone!

I need not start—you’re sure—
That night will never be—
When frightened—home to Thee I run—
To find the windows dark—
And no more Dollie—mark—
Quite none?

Be sure you’re sure—you know—
I’ll bear it better now—
If you’ll just tell me so—
Than when—a little dull Balm grown—
Over this pain of mine—
You sting—again!

Emily Dickinson Love Poems That Rhyme

These Emily Dickinson love poems that rhyme are especially breathtaking, taking you on a journey through the depths of love and emotion. Whether you’re a poetry fanatic or just looking for a good read, these poems are definitely worth checking out. Just make sure you have a box of tissues nearby – you’ll need them.

1. Love’s Humility

       by Emily Dickinson

My worthiness is all my doubt,
His merit all my fear,
Contrasting which, my qualities
Do lowlier appear;

Lest I should insufficient prove
For his beloved need,
The chiefest apprehension
Within my loving creed.

So I, the undivine abode
Of his elect content,
Conform my soul as ‘t were a church
Unto her sacrament.

2. To Lose Thee, Sweeter Than to Gain

       by Emily Dickinson

To lose thee, sweeter than to gain
All other hearts I knew.
‘T is true the drought is destitute,
But then I had the dew!

The Caspian has its realms of sand,
Its other realm of sea;
Without the sterile perquisite
No Caspian could be.

3. Song

       by Emily Dickinson

Summer for thee grant I may be
When summer days are flown!
Thy music still when whippoorwill
And oriole are done!

For thee to bloom, I’ll skip the tomb
And sow my blossoms o’er!
Pray gather me, Anemone,
Thy flower forevermore!

4. I Taste a Liquor Never Brewed

       by Emily Dickinson

I taste a liquor never brewed,
From tankards scooped in pearl;
Not all the vats upon the Rhine
Yield such an alcohol!

Inebriate of air am I,
And debauchee of dew,
Reeling, through endless summer days,
From inns of molten blue.

When the landlord turn the drunken bee
Out of the foxglove’s door,
When butterflies renounce their drams,
I shall but drink the more!

Till seraphs swing their snowy hats,
And saints to windows run,
To see the little tippler
Leaning against the sun!

5. When Roses Cease to Bloom, Dear

       by Emily Dickinson

When roses cease to bloom, dear,
And violets are done,
When bumble-bees in solemn flight
Have passed beyond the sun,

The hand that paused to gather
Upon this summer’s day
Will idle lie, in Auburn, —
Then take my flower, pray!

6. Tell All the Truth but Tell It Slant

       by Emily Dickinson

Tell all the truth but tell it slant —
Success in Circuit lies
Too bright for our infirm Delight
The Truth’s superb surprise
As Lightning to the Children eased
With explanation kind
The Truth must dazzle gradually
Or every man be blind —

7. With Flowers (XXV)

       by Emily Dickinson

If recollecting were forgetting,
Then I remember not;
And if forgetting, recollecting,
How near I had forgot!
And if to miss were merry,
And if to mourn were gay,
How very blithe the fingers
That gathered these to-day

8. We Cover Thee, Sweet Face

       by Emily Dickinson

We cover thee, sweet face.
Not that we tire of thee,
But that thyself fatigue of us;
Remember, as thou flee,
We follow thee until
Thou notice us no more,
And then, reluctant, turn away
To con thee o’er and o’er,
And blame the scanty love
We were content to show,
Augmented, sweet, a hundred fold
If thou would’st take it now.

9. Not with a Club, the Heart Is Broken

       by Emily Dickinson

Not with a club, the Heart is broken,
Nor with a stone;
A Whip so small you could not see it
I’ve known

To lash the magic creature
Till it fell,    
Yet that whip’s name too noble
Then to tell.
 
Magnanimous of bird   
By boy descried,
To sing unto the stone 
Of which it died.

10. The Test of Love—Is Death

       by Emily Dickinson

The Test of Love—is Death—
Our Lord—”so loved”—it saith—
What Largest Lover—hath
Another—doth—

If smaller Patience—be—
Through less Infinity—
If Bravo, sometimes swerve—
Through fainter Nerve—

Accept its Most—
And overlook—the Dust—
Last—Least—
The Cross’—Request—

Final Thoughts

One thing is for sure: Emily Dickinson love poems are timeless and powerful.

Along her poetic journey, she has left us with lasting works of art that tap into our feelings and dreams.

We can always come back to these Emily Dickinson poems about love time after time … a reminder that true love is the most valuable asset we could ever ask for in life.

We hope you enjoyed this list – have fun digging into the depths of Emily Dickinson’s rich language and everlasting legacy!

If you liked what you read here today please share this with your friends; if not, please comment in the comments section below – we’d love to hear from you!

Thank you for joining us on our literary exploration; don’t forget to take some moments throughout your day to appreciate the power of love!

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